Category Archives: Noloholo Education Programs

Seeing Lions: An Intern’s Experience at Noloholo’s Environmental Summer Camp

By Savannah Swinea

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The road we travel is so bumpy – I fear every moment that I will be thrown out into the outskirts of Tarangire National Park. But the students around me show no fear, only happiness and excitement, so I relax as we traverse the Maasai Steppe of Northern Tanzania spotting zebra, giraffe, and antelope. Suddenly, the car stops and all heads turn as we are told that lions are nearby. We see them in the distance, and the students become quiet with awe as they stare through their binoculars. I ask, “Have you ever seen lions before?” They all shake their heads, saying “no” without words. The two lionesses lie close together under the shade of an acacia tree. After a long period of silent observation, the Land Rover starts again and we continue to explore the savannah ecosystem. When we return to the campsite, it is evident that the journey has sparked the interest of the students, and their environmental teachings about these beautifully unique creatures can finally be put into the perspective of one lucky enough to see them in person.

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As an intern in the Environmental Education department of the African People and Wildlife Fund, I work closely with the primary school students who venture to Noloholo as part of the environmental summer camps hosted here. The camps give top students in the area practical knowledge of their environment and how to take care of it, and sometimes provide a glimpse at the vulnerable species that become more rare every day. The students are not only intelligent and motivated but are also kind and fun-loving. I believe their sense of adventure and awareness of their environment will allow them to succeed as stewards of the country that is their home: Tanzania.

Camp kids playing at Noloholo

10 Years of People & Wildlife [VIDEO]

Full article published on National Geographic Cat Watch

Just ten years ago, two young explorers set up camp by a small acacia at the top of a hill given to them by the rural Tanzanian community of Loibor Siret. That camp was to eventually become a permanent base for the African People & Wildlife Fund’s conservation programs focusing on the lions of the Maasai Steppe – a program that now protects thousands of head of livestock and 100 lions every year with over 500 Living Walls. With one side of the hill looking to the community rangelands and the other side looking to the eastern edge of Tarangire National Park, a flagship haven for African biodiversity, the location was a perfect metaphor for the work they set out to do.

Those two explorers were Dr. Laly Lichtenfeld and Charles Trout, now directors of the African People & Wildlife Fund (APW). What started as a tent on top of a land rover has grown into an operation that spans 19 communities across 30 000 km2 of Northern Tanzanian rangelands. The small two-man tent has been replaced by the Noloholo Environmental Center, a one-of-a-kind emblem combining traditional architecture and sustainable design that stands on top of the hill where it all started and marks the organization’s headquarters in Tanzania. The newly released 2014 Annual Report highlights the milestones of the last ten years, and as we celebrate a decade of success on the Steppe we invite you to share in celebrating Big Cats and Communities in Northern Tanzania.

This video highlights the journey we have taken over these past 10 years, and the strong relationships that have stemmed from it:

Three New Schools Join the Fun at 2014 Noloholo Environmental Camps

By Deirdre Leowinata

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Summer Camp: For many, the term brings fond memories of campfires, fast friendships, ”cannon balls” into cold water, mess halls, and hiding from the counselors when they tell you to go to sleep. For many families in North America, summer camp is a given.

In the communities that we work in here on the Maasai Steppe, summer camp is a little different. For those students who participate, our Noloholo Environmental Camps are highly competitive, involving a combined evaluation from school grades in addition to two separate tests. And if they don’t study, even the best students can’t assume they will get in, with only five boys and five girls taken from each school. When they finish their tests, students wait anxiously to hear whether they will be taking the bumpy ride to camp in our trusty lorry. For those whose names are called, you will never see children run as fast to get permission forms signed by their parents. For those whose names are not called, some can try again next year, and a gentle pep talk from our Conservation Education program officer, Neovitus “Neo” Sianga, returns smiles to the children’s faces.

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This year, we added three new primary schools to the environmental camp program: Emboret, Loibor Soit, and Mbuko. So far, we have held two weeks of camp: one for the students of Loibor Soit and Mbuko, and the second for Kangala and Emboret. As per usual, and especially for the new schools, students entered cautiously, with wary glances at unfamiliar foods (like bread and peanut butter). But also as per usual, they quickly became accustomed to camp, and the initial timidity dissolved with the small candy rewards they placed in their mouths. By the end of the week, virtually every arm went up when a question was posed.

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On the list of draws for the kids, camp provides three good meals plus two snacks a day, a severe lack of chores, clean rooms to sleep in, and absolutely no physical punishment. Our Conservation Education duo consisting of Neo and Revocatus Magayane use teaching methods that are both instructive and fun, which are two words that aren’t often used in the same sentence here on the Maasai Steppe. Children receive prizes for raising their hands, games of tag teach lessons about ecological relationships, and game drives treat them to a different perspective on the wildlife that live in their own backyards. Each day, campers have lessons on topics from ecology and natural history, to project management and astronomy, while at the same time learning about what our team does here for conservation. Lessons are taught in dynamic and interactive ways that are constantly raising their confidence in important life skills such as public speaking, organization, and debate. They are exposed to role models such as our own Joyce Ndakaru and Elvis Kisimir, and on culture day, even our interns get involved in presenting their own special family traditions alongside Maasai elders. At the end of the week every attendee receives a certificate of completion, and the most actively participating boy and girl receive their deserved recognition. Each and every child goes home a little bit wiser, a little bit braver, and a little bit plumper.

It’s no wonder our camps are so popular here.

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Bonding Over Books: The 2014 Noloholo Scholar Retreat

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Left to right: Namelok, Karakai, and Rahely are three of our more senior scholars. Bonding happens quickly during the scholars’ two-week stay at camp.

We all remember high school. The days of cramming for full days (or not), the horror that was public speaking, along with the mild to extreme social pressure that hits everyone at some point in time. Once a year, our Noloholo Environmental Scholars can escape from all that.

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Scholars enter the dorm at camp in Noloholo. During their stay, the students spend every moment together whether sleeping or waking.

They come home from boarding school in Monduli and spend two weeks in camp together to bond and help each other through whatever difficulties they may have, whether in school or out. And if they weren’t close before, everything changes pretty fast while they study for their standardized school exams. With days that start at 8am and don’t stop until 10pm, they spend every moment, whether sleeping or waking, together. When I was that age, a week in I would have been hesitant to return to the classroom at 8pm for the night session, but when asked, our scholars just say “We want to go back to study”. And that’s the kind of commitment that brought them to where they are now. Bringing them together in camp provides a unique opportunity: the younger scholars can gain valuable mentorship from their elders, and the senior scholars can learn all the better, because you never learn more than you do by teaching. Plus, when you’re going to boarding school in an unfamiliar place, it’s always good to have friends.

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A teacher from Moringe Secondary School helps a group of Form 1 students tackle subjects including Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Math, Geography, History, English, and Swahili.

For the scholars, intensive work in new and difficult situations is a part of everyday life. Not only have they left their homes in the villages, but also here in Tanzania, secondary school classes are taught in English with no transition period in between to learn the language. Last week, each of our scholars got up in front of the classroom to teach a subject of their choice – and yes, it was in English. Sure, there were nerves, and watching them may have released my own scary memories of high school French class, but I never had to explain advanced functions, research methods, or the concept of relative density in French in order to maintain my prospect of finishing high school.

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Kelvin teaches his fellow scholars how to calculate the density of an object. The best way to learn is to teach, and each student taught one subject of their choice during their stay.

What each and every one of these scholars has achieved is nothing short of inspiring. During the day, they display tremendously high levels of discipline, determination, and maturity. It is only when the books are closed, the sunlight hits their faces, and they head down to play and chatter with cheeky smiles that their adolescence becomes apparent.

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Work hard, play hard. After a long day of studying, the students (and the teacher too!) enjoy a game of soccer by the dorm.

So what exactly is our scholar retreat? It is school, it is camp, and it is a little cross-section of life in its most concentrated form. But, like a cocoon, what comes out is visibly and marvelously different from what goes in, and it’s a very special thing to see. For our education team here at Noloholo, it means a whole lot more than any of our scholars may realize. If we had to pick a moment that makes our work worthwhile, a great place to start is this period of time when our scholars come and show us just how much they’ve grown.

 

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Paulo grins behind his Physics textbook, revealing his less serious side!

And We Give you…Our 2014 Noloholo Environmental Scholars!

By Deirdre Leowinata

It’s an exciting time of year for students in the villages surrounding Noloholo. If they excelled at their exams and their transcripts are good, primary school graduates may compete for one of our environmental scholarships. We award these scholarships once every year to students who are not only top of their class, but also must be active in their community’s environmental initiatives and APW’s wildlife clubs. The scholarship is sometimes the only means of continuing their education, so it’s an important event for the students, our education team and the communities of the Maasai Steppe.

Students who excel in school and participate actively in wildlife clubs compete for scholarships to attend secondary school in Arusha.

Students who excel in school and participate actively in wildlife clubs compete for scholarships to attend secondary school in Arusha.

To qualify, students must complete our Noloholo environmental exam, as well as the private secondary school entrance exam and a national standardized exam. The scholarships cover everything from tuition, to supplies, to tutoring. If the student continues to excel, it will cover these expenses for their entire secondary education. In Tanzania, that means Forms 1-6, which is the equivalent of grade 8 through high school, plus an additional two years of advanced studies. So, is it worth it? Without a doubt!

A student studies geography at Noloholo summer camp.

Exams are stressful for everyone, and to qualify for the scholarship, students write three!

This year, we added eight new scholars to our roster, which brings our total count to 22! That means eight more students can realize dreams of becoming engineers, scientists, doctors, or anything else they hope for – eight more students have a choice. Eight more students whose environmental interests propelled them forward.

This year’s new recipients are: Langida Pakasi, Kelvin Jacob, Samuel Lekumok, Paulo Kisota, Nengai Godwin, Anna Taon, Jessica Hando, and William Jackson. Samuel is the first scholar we have from the village of Narakauwo, so congratulations!

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Our continuing students also make us proud as they advance their education at the Moringe Private Secondary School in Monduli, about 150 km from our center. Karakai is head boy, Rama is fourth in his class, and Hussein is an active member of the soccer team! Raphael, Lazaro, and Stella have passed their national exams; they will be our first class of scholars to do their advanced studies in Form 5 and 6.

Congratulations to our new and continuing scholars! We are so happy to be able to support you as you grow.