Tag Archives: conservation

A New USAID-funded Community-based Conservation Initiative Launches in Northern Tanzania

By the African People & Wildlife Fund

Wildlife conservation in Africa is complex. To get it right, conservationists must work with a diverse range of partners supporting a vast number of initiatives – livestock keeping, farming, economic development, land use, health, and education to name just a few.

More than a decade ago, the African People & Wildlife Fund (APW) understood this basic principle, which is the essence of its grassroots community-based natural resource management program in Northern Tanzania. This program implements the organization’s four-step integrated process for long-term conservation success and has led to several strong partnerships.

One of those collaborative ventures, the Northern Tanzania Rangelands Initiative (NTRI), has gained serious momentum in recent months. Now with a coalition of nine organizations that is led by The Nature Conservancy, NTRI recently launched a five-year USAID-funded project called Endangered Ecosystems of Northern Tanzania.

(Photo courtesy of APW/Laly Lichtenfeld)

(Photo courtesy of APW/Laly Lichtenfeld)

“Our local sister organization, Tanzania People & Wildlife, is a founding member of NTRI. We have long respected the need for such robust partnerships,” explained Dr. Laly Lichtenfeld, APW’s executive director. “It is the only way to have a far-reaching positive impact to fully benefit both people and wildlife.”

Besides The Nature Conservancy and Tanzania People & Wildlife, the coalition includes the Wildlife Conservation Society, Honeyguide, Carbon Tanzania, the Ujamaa Community Resource Trust, Dorobo Fund, Maliasili Initiatives, Oikos Institute, and Pathfinder International.

Such a powerhouse team did not come together overnight. The conversations began several years ago, and it took considerable patience and perseverance for NTRI to stand as a united coalition.

(Photo courtesy of APW/Felipe Rodriguez)

(Photo courtesy of APW/Felipe Rodriguez)

Today, with the support of USAID, NTRI has multiple integrated goals for its first full-scale project, including strengthening wildlife management and anti-poaching; securing land for conservation and sustainable natural resource use; increasing the capacity of communities and their leaders in governance; diversifying livelihoods through conservation-based business enterprises; boosting communities’ resiliency to climate change; and providing greater health access, specifically for women and youth.

The broad-sweeping project will allow APW and its sister organization, Tanzania People & Wildlife, to expand their long-standing human-wildlife conflict prevention programs and further develop more recent ventures, such as those in rangeland management, enterprise development, and honey production.

(Photo courtesy of APW/Felipe Rodriguez)

(Photo courtesy of APW/Felipe Rodriguez)

“This is only the beginning for NTRI,” said Dr. Lichtenfeld. “We have a long road ahead before we truly see communities realize sustainable management over their resources. But with such strong partnerships and collective support, we will help to ensure a future where people and wildlife can both thrive.”

What Does the Endangered Species Listing Mean for Lions?

In late December last year, the African lion received a special gift from the U.S. government. Over the past few years, non-profit groups, the national and international public, and the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service itself, have been rallying the government to protect lions under the Endangered Species Act. And just in time for Christmas last year, the king of cats got its name on the Act. But what does the listing really mean for lion conservation? In this blog we explore what an endangered listing on a U.S. document really means for an African species.

By Deirdre Leowinata

In the Chinese zodiac, 2015 was the year of the sheep. However, the illegal hunting of Cecil the lion, the Kenyan Marsh pride poisonings, and other highly publicized lion poaching incidents of 2015 made last year the year of the lion in the media. And as if by magic, a present came at the end of the year in the form of a “Threatened” listing for the African lion on the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA).

The Endangered Species Act of 1973, under the leadership of Richard Nixon, was a defining point in U.S. and global environmental protection. It made incredible leaps over the Endangered Species Conservation Act of 1969 and the original Endangered Species Preservation Act of 1966. It not only recognized the value of species for education, research, and recreation, but also included species’ habitats under its umbrella of protection. In the original act, hunting and trading were not regulated at all. In less than 50 years, we have come a very long way in our policies for protecting wildlife. But we also live in an age where endangered species are disappearing faster than we can save them — scientists are calling it the sixth mass extinction. Conservation projects like our Northern Tanzania Big Cats Conservation Initiative have been working tirelessly to make sure that lions have a fighting chance as human and environmental changes put pressure on the remaining populations. However, lion numbers have declined by about 50% in the past 30 years, and the majority of the remaining populations are spread over only 10 regions in South and East Africa.

In 2011, five groups — the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW), Born Free, Defenders of Wildlife, the Humane Society of the United States, and the Humane Society International petitioned the U.S. government for a listing for lions in the ESA. The petition prompted a formal review of the subspecies. In 2014, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service officially proposed ESA protection for lions after announcing that African lions were under threat of extinction by 2050. In December 2015, the landmark announcement was made: The African lion was under the protection of the ESA.

Internationally, the lion is already listed as “Vulnerable” under the International Union for the Conservation of Nature’s (IUCN 2015) Red List of Threatened Species.

So what does an American listing mean for lions? Wild lions don’t roam the United States, so how does a listing for a species in another country help?

 

  1. Hunting Permits

The largest win for the ESA listing is arguably the effects of a section of the act that affects sport hunting imports. Regulations for importing trophies ensure they come from countries with sound management plans and sustainable lion populations, with penalties for those who do not follow the rules. This not only ensures that U.S. trophy seekers hunt from viable populations, but also incentivizes countries that rely on sport hunting to maintain population management standards. It is also up to the hunter to demonstrate that all of these standards have been met, and that requirement alone might slow down the number of permits processed.

 

  1. International Trade

The U.S. is currently the world’s largest lion trophy importer, with 24 countries in Africa participating in the lion trade. Closely related to the hunting permit provisions, controlling what can be imported will have a strong impact on the number of lion products (including trophies) that are crossing the border and the integrity of their source countries. Because of the ESA provisions for sustainable management as mentioned above, the listing will ensure that American importers or international exporters are doing so in a way that will not impair lion populations.

 

  1. Provision of Assistance for Conservation Efforts

Under ESA protection, lions and the programs that protect them will gain access to more financial assistance, as well as more help on the ground. This part of the Act is vague, but because of the ESA mandate to protect critical habitat of listed species, conservation groups may be able to levy this for government funding. In the very least, it increases the funding potential for environmental non-profits, which often struggle to make small budgets stretch across programs.

 

  1. Symbolism

Like a handshake shared between two leaders, a gesture can send a very powerful message. By shielding lions under the proverbial wing, the U.S. is sending a message of solidarity to lion conservation groups and the rest of the world. Aside from the ways in which this document will aid in conservation funding and other assistance, a vote of support from the government can do a world of good in other ways.

 

At the African People & Wildlife Fund, we have committed to help conserve Tanzania’s lion populations through community-based projects, educating local people about the importance of the species, and continuing to work on projects like our Living Walls to prevent retaliatory lion killings, which the IUCN suggests is an even greater threat to lions than sport hunting. With your help, we are expanding our initiatives across rural communities in Northern Tanzania where most of these killings take place. Tanzania may be one of the last lion strongholds on Earth right now. Together with you and the new support of the ESA, we are extremely hopeful that we can help protect the lion populations of Tanzania so they can grow and thrive in Africa once more.

Echoing the words of hope from U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service director Dan Ashe, this is an opportunity for change, and it is up to all of us to help save these big cats.

If you would like to contribute to our growing efforts to protect big cats on the ground in Tanzania, please visit our donation page here.

 

References

Bauer, H., Packer, C., Funston, P.F., Henschel, P. & Nowell, K. (2015). Panthera leo. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2015: e.T15951A79929984.http://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2015-4.RLTS.T15951A79929984.en. Downloaded on 30 December 2015.

Florida Museum of Natural History. History of the United States Endangered Species Act.https://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/fish/education/ESA.htm. Accessed on 4 January 2016.

Platt, J.R. (2014). African Lions Face Extinction by 2050, Could Gain Endangered Species Act Protection. Scientific American (2014).

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (2014). Service Proposes Endangered Species Act Protection for the African Lion.

Born Free U.S.A. www.bornfreeusa.org

A Big Year for African Wildlife: Seven Milestones of 2015

This story was original published on National Geographic Cat Watch on January 15th, 2016.

 

Photo courtesy of Massimiliano Sticca.
Photo courtesy of Massimiliano Sticca.

With the closing of 2015 comes the end of a big chapter for Africa and its spectacular wildlife. Looking back on the year, we reflect on the big wins and big changes for wildlife conservation in this huge, unique continent. Here are the top seven milestones for African wildlife in 2015.

By Deirdre Leowinata

  1. The U.S. Government listed African Lions under the Endangered Species Act.

To cap a year that won the world over in a fervor of lion activism, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service announced in late December that it would put the king of cats on the U.S. Endangered Species Act. This means a few things, especially for hunting permits and conservation aid, but the significance is that lions have a new and influential official guardian.

  1. Cecil the Lion spurred policy changes and donations to wildlife conservation.

#CeciltheLion was by far the most famous animal of 2015, and is right up there with Mickey Mouse on the list of animals that have become a household name. The poaching of Cecil the Lion by Minnesota Dentist Walter Palmer triggered a global outcry for lion conservation unlike any the world has seen. And it worked. Not only did Cecil ignite a rush of donations to big-cat conservation and other wildlife conservation groups but it affected policy as well. New policies in place or in the works include commitments to ban the import of lion trophies by France and Britain, and banning the transport of animal trophies by more than 40 airlines. Whether it affected the U.S. decision to list lions on the ESA is unknown, but it probably didn’t hurt.

  1. African nations pledged to restore 100 million hectares of forest by 2030.

In a massive United Nations initiative officially referred to as AFR100, more than a dozen of Africa’s 54 countries pledged to restore their forests in a continent-wide effort to combat climate change and protect ecosystems. These countries include hosts of some of the continent’s most precious landscapes, including the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Madagascar, both of which house the last remaining populations of some of the world’s most unique species.

  1. U.S. and Chinese governments joined forces to put a final ban on the ivory trade.

In September, the U.S. and Chinese governments announced an agreement to work together toalmost completely ban the import and export of ivory. If it plays out, the agreement is a monumental decision for African elephants. China is the world’s top ivory consumer, and stopping the trade could save 30,000 elephants a year.

  1. Pope Francis issued an encyclical on the environment, encouraging the entire Roman Catholic church to care for our planet.

Okay, we have to say it: Pope Francis has done a lot for everyone this year, but this is a big deal. The encyclical, “Laudato Si” (Praise Be to You), is a papal document that every bishop and every priest of the Roman Catholic church has an obligation to read, and every member of the church has an obligation to recognize. And not only does this papal document recognize manmade global warming but it also speaks to issues of pollution, water, biodiversity, human life, equality, and the ethics of it all.

  1. The UN recognized wildlife trafficking as a transnational crime.

After a UN General Assembly decision in July of this year, wildlife trafficking officially became a serious crime. The United Nations Environment Programme executive director, Achim Steiner, called the resolution “a historic step forward,” and it could well be a defining moment. The resolution not only called on nations to legislate and cooperate on illegal trafficking enforcement but also recognized its link with organized crime and suffering in local communities. It could mean the world to species such as the rhino that are on the brink of extinction.

  1. NGOs and Chinese Internet Kingpin Tencent joined forces for elephants.

The Nature Conservancy and the International Fund for Animal Welfare have partnered with Tencent, a major Chinese Internet company, to battle online wildlife trafficking and promote the conservation of elephants. In the bigger picture, the collaboration is the first conservation project Tencent has partnered on. It, along with the recent U.S.-China partnership, may be a sign of China’s changing attitudes on wildlife conservation, which could mean a whole lot more for wildlife from 2016 onwards.

 

And as a fun bonus…2015 also brought Taylor Swift’s “Wildest Dreams” music video, featuring a slew of beautiful African wildlife, including her very own lion friend. Now, celebrity endorsements can be a bit shallow, and the video may misguide viewers about the behavior of wild lions (we of course do not promote lion handling), but there’s something to be said for the reach of a music video with over 300 million views. An influencer is an influencer, and out of all the celebrities, Ms. Swift and her video are not bad to have on your side. Plus, all of the funds generated by the video went to the African Parks Foundation of America. Until now Swift has been very generous to humanities, but this is the first time she has donated to conservation efforts. Perhaps this could be the beckoning call we needed.

Are Fences the Solution for Protecting Africa’s National Parks?

An aerial image of the sharp line formed by the fence of a rhino sanctuary.
(Photo by George Wittemyer)

With the expansion of human populations, instances of human-wildlife conflict become increasingly frequent. One proposed solution to protect both people and wildlife is the implementation of fences around established protected areas. Many conservation scientists argue that these fences may do more harm than good. A recent paper published in June by some of the world’s most renowned conservation scientists gives policy makers the guidelines they need to decide whether a fence is the best solution for them.

By Deirdre Leowinata

Originally posted on National Geographic Cat Watch on Thursday July 9th, 2015

To fence or not to fence…

That is the question that has some members of the conservation community in knots. Subjects involving land use policy, such as the park size debate of the 1970s and 1980s, tend to garner attention both in and out of the scientific community, and fencing is no different. The outcomes of this particular battle have the potential to change the lives of millions of people as well as wildlife species dependent on some of the world’s most remarkable landscapes, so it might be wise to pay attention.

A recent paper co-authored by 45 scientists from around the world aims to help governments and policy-makers choose what protection plan is right for their parks by providing six critical factors to assess when making fencing decisions. The comprehensive paper, published in the Journal of Applied Ecology, accounts for social and economic factors in addition to environmental ones. The factors are: economics, edge permeability, reserve design, connectivity, ecosystem services, and communities.

A fence in Mali-Gourma region, purpose unknown.
(Photo by Jake Wall)

In Africa, the subject of fencing is especially sensitive because many of its animals require large tracts of rangeland for seasonal migrations. The Serengeti-Mara ecosystem, for example, is home to the largest overland migration on the planet, with huge numbers of wildebeest and other hoofed animals moving around a 30,000-km2 area. The migration helps drive the regional patterns of biodiversity, including prey availability for the big cats. Closer to our headquarters on the Maasai Steppe, Tanzania’s Tarangire National Park makes for a perfect example of a dry season haven, with some of Tanzania’s highest concentrations of wildlife migrating into the area when the seasonal rains stop – including one of Africa’s only growing population of elephants. Fencing lands such as the Serengeti or Tarangire National Parks could significantly and permanently alter entire processes and landscapes by keeping ecosystem engineers such as wildebeest and elephants from their regular migrations. Those consequences would almost certainly trickle down to the communities inhabiting those regions and may also have unintended and ironic effects on the animals they’re built to protect.

A wildebeest dies after it is caught in a fence in Mara Kenya
(Photo by Jackson Looseyia)

Despite the uncertainty of fencing effects on ecosystems, certain African countries have already taken steps in new directions. Rwanda has fenced the 120-km border of its Akagera National Park in an attempt to stem human-wildlife conflict — at a cost of $2.5 million. Human-wildlife conflict may be the most common reason to fence protected areas; Uganda is leaning toward fencing all of its parks, and Malawi is contemplating using electric fence on all of its parks.

There are, as the authors do point out, multiple positive draws to fencing. Fences can be used to stop disease transmission, prevent the entry of invasive species, and curb direct resource extraction. In certain cases, such as the Australian drylands, fencing may currently be the best solution. However, because of the weighty financial and potential ecological costs of such an undertaking, it must be carefully evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

cheetah_Laly
 (Photo by African People & Wildlife Fund/Laly Lichtenfeld)

Dryland ecosystems such as those in the Serengeti-Mara system of East Africa account for 41% of the world’s land and house a large percentage of the world’s biodiversity as well as 2 billion of its people. As the paper points out, those 2 billion people include some of the world’s most marginalized communities, such as the semi-nomadic Maasai tribe that dominates the East African communities where we work. The African People & Wildlife Fund has spent the last 10 years developing strategies to reduce human-wildlife conflict that benefit both parties, with very encouraging results. In Northern Tanzania, access to resources such as seasonal water holes and grazing lands are necessary to support the communities of people and wildlife that have lived here for hundreds of years. In these landscapes, the reduced mobility that a fence might cause could mean the loss of either an iconic culture, or an iconic cat. This reinforces the need to develop solutions that promote coexistence, keeping both cats and cultures alive.

 

References:

Borner, M. (1985). The increasing isolation of Tarangire National Park. Oryx 19: 91-96.

Durant, S.M., Becker, M.S., Creel, S., Bashir, S., Dickman, A.J., Beudels-Jamar, R.C., Lichtenfeld, L., Hilborn, R., Wall, J., Wittemyer, G., Badamjav, L., Blake, S., Boitani, L, Breitenmoser, C., Broekhuis, F., Christianson, D., Cozzi, G., Davenport, T.R.B., Deutsch, J., Devillers, P., Dollar, L., Dolrenry, S., Douglas-Hamilton, I., Dröge, E., FitzHerbert, E., Foley, C., Hazzah, L., Hopcraft, J.G.C., Ikanda, D., Jacobson, A., Joubert, D., Kelly, M.J., Milanzi, J., Mitchell, N., M’Soka, J., Msuha, M., Mweetwa, T., Nyahongo, J., Rosenblatt, E., Schuette, P., Sillero-Zubiri, C., Sinclair, A.R.E., Price, M.R.S., Zimmerman, A., and N. Pettorelli (2015). Developing fencing policies for dryland ecosystems. Journal of Applied Ecology 52: 544-551.

Holdo R.M., Holt, R.D., and J.M. Fryxell (2009). Opposing rainfall and plant nutritional gradients best explain the wildebeest migration in the Serengeti. The American Naturalist 173: 431-445.

Seeing Lions: An Intern’s Experience at Noloholo’s Environmental Summer Camp

By Savannah Swinea

Savannah_and_Campers

The road we travel is so bumpy – I fear every moment that I will be thrown out into the outskirts of Tarangire National Park. But the students around me show no fear, only happiness and excitement, so I relax as we traverse the Maasai Steppe of Northern Tanzania spotting zebra, giraffe, and antelope. Suddenly, the car stops and all heads turn as we are told that lions are nearby. We see them in the distance, and the students become quiet with awe as they stare through their binoculars. I ask, “Have you ever seen lions before?” They all shake their heads, saying “no” without words. The two lionesses lie close together under the shade of an acacia tree. After a long period of silent observation, the Land Rover starts again and we continue to explore the savannah ecosystem. When we return to the campsite, it is evident that the journey has sparked the interest of the students, and their environmental teachings about these beautifully unique creatures can finally be put into the perspective of one lucky enough to see them in person.

CampLion-1_Twitter

As an intern in the Environmental Education department of the African People and Wildlife Fund, I work closely with the primary school students who venture to Noloholo as part of the environmental summer camps hosted here. The camps give top students in the area practical knowledge of their environment and how to take care of it, and sometimes provide a glimpse at the vulnerable species that become more rare every day. The students are not only intelligent and motivated but are also kind and fun-loving. I believe their sense of adventure and awareness of their environment will allow them to succeed as stewards of the country that is their home: Tanzania.

Camp kids playing at Noloholo

10 Years of People & Wildlife [VIDEO]

Full article published on National Geographic Cat Watch

Just ten years ago, two young explorers set up camp by a small acacia at the top of a hill given to them by the rural Tanzanian community of Loibor Siret. That camp was to eventually become a permanent base for the African People & Wildlife Fund’s conservation programs focusing on the lions of the Maasai Steppe – a program that now protects thousands of head of livestock and 100 lions every year with over 500 Living Walls. With one side of the hill looking to the community rangelands and the other side looking to the eastern edge of Tarangire National Park, a flagship haven for African biodiversity, the location was a perfect metaphor for the work they set out to do.

Those two explorers were Dr. Laly Lichtenfeld and Charles Trout, now directors of the African People & Wildlife Fund (APW). What started as a tent on top of a land rover has grown into an operation that spans 19 communities across 30 000 km2 of Northern Tanzanian rangelands. The small two-man tent has been replaced by the Noloholo Environmental Center, a one-of-a-kind emblem combining traditional architecture and sustainable design that stands on top of the hill where it all started and marks the organization’s headquarters in Tanzania. The newly released 2014 Annual Report highlights the milestones of the last ten years, and as we celebrate a decade of success on the Steppe we invite you to share in celebrating Big Cats and Communities in Northern Tanzania.

This video highlights the journey we have taken over these past 10 years, and the strong relationships that have stemmed from it:

Another Happy Herdsman – Yohana Lojumbutwa Receives APW’s 250th Living Wall

Yohana Lojumbutwa has been living in his boma for eighteen years. He used to protect his seventy head of cattle with the dry, feeble thorn bushes used by the majority of Maasai pastoralists. But recently, he installed the last component of his new Living Wall.

 

APW designed its Living Walls to protect big cats, people and livestock while preserving the environment. Since our first installation in 2008, they have done just that.

 

Cloaked in his bright blue shuka, Yohana greets us warmly at his boma with his sons and nephews. Around the cattle corral, newly planted Commiphora africana poles are ready for binding with chain-link fencing. It took Yohana three weeks to cut the branches of mature Commiphora trees, find a tractor to haul them to his boma and wait for the branches to dry before planting them around his boma. This may seem like a long time, but he won’t have to do it again for at least another 25 years.

 

“Prior to my Living Wall, I had to replace the thorn bushes around my corral every three months. It takes three weeks just to get enough thorns because all the bushes in the area are gone,” Yohana said. Like many other Maasai households, Yohana’s wives and the elders at his boma are responsible for replacing the thorny bush fences. As time passes, the women and elders have to travel farther and farther to get the bushes because the closest ones were cut long ago – a classic case of deforestation.

 

The Commiphora trees used to reinforce the chain-link fencing for Living Walls are branches or cuttings from mature trees. The “parent” tree isn’t cut down or killed in the process.  Our technique helps to prevent habitat loss and further deforestation, in fact we are increasing the number of trees on the Steppe. Livestock owners dry the Commiphora branches for about a week and then plant them around the boma.

 

“It’s extremely hard work cutting the thorns for traditional bomas,” Yohana said. Remarking on his new Living Wall, he adds, “Not only are the women happy, but I am happy too because now the cattle can’t break out of the boma and I don’t have to collect them when they do.” Yohana isn’t sure how many times carnivores attacked his cattle over the years. But, he says the majority of the attacks happen when the cattle break out of the boma and run off into the open fields and grasslands. Earlier in the year, he lost two cows to lions that had attacked the herd after they had escaped from the boma.

“There isn’t anyone who doesn’t want a Living Wall. Everyone with a boma wants a wall,” Yohana said with a wide grin as the last foot of chain-link was nailed into a commiphora post.

Camera Trapping with the Warriors for Wildlife – The Challenges of Big Cat Monitoring

Nothing brings people together like a Serbian military lorry – especially when the seats are removed to accommodate huge cement moraines. The APW camera-trapping vehicle of choice, affectionately called “Tammy”, can only be described as a green beast: a glorious and practical green beast, but a beast nonetheless. Standing four feet tall atop its six wheels, and ten feet at its full height, Tammy can withstand even the deepest potholes, which are often more like small chasms here. You would never think to describe such a machine as practical unless you lived in Tanzania.

Camera Trapping

Our warriors for wildlife were busy all week lifting heavy moraines in and out of Tammy to set up camera traps for monitoring the local wildlife.

This past week, our Warriors for Wildlife were busy setting up camera traps in local korongos (riverbeds) with Dennis Minja, APW’s wildlife monitoring program officer. Don’t let the word “local” fool you – after all, this is not the suburbs. A two-mile trip usually involves navigating through a herd of cattle, multiple winding detours due to the lack of roads, and one or two close calls with the acacia thorn. After five full days of hard work, the team managed to set up 16 cameras at 8 different locations, with two facing cameras per trap.

For those of you who are unfamiliar with the procedures involved in camera trapping, you should note that it does not require any actual trapping of animals – just pictures.  It does, however, require a lot of planning, a lot of manual labour, and a whole lot of patience. And like life, you always have to account for the fact that things don’t always work out the way you plan.

First of all, the moraines that are used to hold the cameras are probably about as heavy as a baby elephant, and not nearly as cute. In essence, they are metal boxes attached to metal poles, which in turn are embedded rather unceremoniously into a large block of concrete. If that doesn’t sound appealing, try lifting one (or 16) over your shoulders a few times over.

Secondly, we had a bit of a warm spell this week – thank you climate change – and the warriors’ uniforms are made for protection, not for breathability. After a couple of hours in those things under the “jua kali” (harsh sun), fatigue and dehydration come fast. And in Tammy’s open-air rear, with the dry season air virtually vacuuming water out of your body,   it is hard to avoid.

Finally, it takes a surprising amount of strategy to choose a camera location within a korongo. To be effective for identification purposes, the camera must capture the maximum surface area of the maximum number of animals passing across the designated area, all the while maintaining view of the opposing camera. The cameras are placed in locations that will allow us to monitor the impacts of our conservation programs over time by giving us estimates of animal densities, individual health, and population statuses. To do that, it’s best to ensure that you’re going to get a good view of most animals passing through in order to be able to identify individuals. This involves clearing any brush that may obstruct the shot, which can be hard in a place where everything has evolved to defend itself. There are many things to keep in mind, from varying animal heights to direction of travel. To test shot quality, each game scout took a turn as the hyena throughout the day, trying to create the best impression in gait and call, with both impressive and hilarious results. Why a hyena, I couldn’t tell you, but perhaps it is due to the healing powers of laughter.

We will be checking the traps in the next few weeks, and hopefully we’ll be able to show you what our friendly neighborhood predators are up to. Keep track of our Facebook page for updates, and remember to keep in mind what it takes to get those photos, because it’s a bit more than a walk in the park!

Noloholo Environmental Summer Camps Off to a Great Start

Children from the villages of Loibor Siret and Narakauo arrived yesterday morning for the first week of the Noloholo Environmental Summer Camps. After the first day we are pleased to see these shy, polite kids warming up to the staff here at Noloholo. For the next week they’ll be participating in a wide range of activities and lessons.

Our wildlife monitoring intern, Kelly Stoner with some of the kids bird watching on the patio at the Noloholo Environmental Center.

Our wildlife monitoring intern, Kelly Stoner with some of the kids bird watching on the patio at the Noloholo Environmental Center.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yesterday afternoon, Talia, our environmental education intern gave a lesson on how to create compost.  On several visits to the communities, APW was concerned about the trash disposal, and we hope that by giving the children the tools and information they need they can help create compost heaps in their communities and homes.

Talia Calnek-Sugin, our environmental education intern, giving her lesson on composting.

Talia Calnek-Sugin, our environmental education intern, giving her lesson on composting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Throughout the week, there will be daily bird watching and everyday the children will have a different lesson on the environment and conservation in Tanzania. Before today’s lunch they had a lesson on the history of Tanzanian conservation, which was taught by Neo, our environmental education officer. Neo also taught a lesson on beekeeping. Many of the kids were dressed in costumes and helped depict the life of a bee for the other children. The classroom here at Noloholo has begun to erupt with laughter and applause since the arrival of the kids.

The kids had a binocular lesson yesterday and went outside to apply what they had learnt in the classroom.

The kids had a binocular lesson yesterday and went outside to apply what they had learnt in the classroom.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tomorrow afternoon our wildlife monitoring intern, Kelly, will be taking the children out to see the camera traps at a nearby korongo. She is preparing a short lesson on how they gather information from the cameras and the many species of animals that APW has caught on the traps.

Rachel, a Noloholo Environmental Scholar, misses a volley during a friendly volleyball game after the day's activities.

Rachel, a Noloholo Environmental Scholar, misses a volley during a friendly volleyball game after the day’s activities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some of our environmental scholars will be joining us for the camps, helping the officers with the children and participating in the fun lessons and activities we have planned. Many of them are veterans to the camp, and are attending for the fourth year in a row. They are proving to be great role models for our younger campers who could be our newest potential scholars.

When the dinner bell rings, the footballs stop rolling and the boys stop playing.

When the dinner bell rings, the footballs stop rolling and the boys stop playing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To be considered for the camps, the children were given an exam testing them on the various lessons they have learnt in the Wildlife Clubs. APW chose the top 5 students from the villages Loibor Siret, Narakauo, Kimotorok and Kangala.

Wildlife Clubs get ready for Noloholo Environmental Summer Camps!

The children who participate in our Wildlife Clubs are sitting their examination this week, to be admitted to the Noloholo Environmental Summer Camps in July. We visited a few of the schools in Kimotorok, Loibor Siret and Narakauo last week and were pleased to see that most of the children were working hard on projects and activities focused around helping the environment in their respective communities.

Some members of our team visited the Kimelok Primary School in Kimotorok on Tuesday. They found the schoolyard to be the cleanest of all the communities they had visited. When our environmental education team asked them about what they were doing, the children were proud to report that they had started a trash collecting initiative. The children make sure to collect any garbage they find around, putting it into a pit that the teachers and students help to dig earlier in the year. The environmental education officers at APW are working hard to find a way to ensure they have enough garbage receptacles to place in bathrooms and classrooms as well as around the schoolyard.

Wildlife Club members at Kimelok Primary School in Kimotorok, talk with their teacher and our environmental education officers.

Wildlife Club members at Kimelok Primary School in Kimotorok, talk with their teacher and our environmental education officers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Wildlife Club at Narakauo has started a chicken coop project. Along with their teacher, the children are building a chicken coop, so they can start selling fresh eggs to their community. They hope that with the profits they make from selling eggs, they can take a trip into Tarangire National Park. Although the park is just a few miles west of their community, many of the children have never been inside, and never had a chance to see all the incredible wildlife that calls the park home.

Wildlife Club members from Narokawo Primary School are proudly show off their chicken coop project. Our assistant environmental education officer, Revo, is pictured to the far right.

Wildlife Club members from Narakauo Primary School are proudly showing off their chicken coop project. Our assistant environmental education officer, Revo, is pictured to the far right.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Tuesday afternoon, our environmental education intern, Talia, went to the Loibor Siret Primary School to take a look at the computer that was donated through connections at APW. The computer was donated thanks to the students of Hill Freedman World Academy, a National Geographic Big Cats Initiative sister school. Talia is drawing up a comprehensive curriculum to teach the children how to use the computer, once they have returned to school after their summer break.

Our environmental education intern, Talia, takes a look at the computer in Loibor Siret. She's  developing a curriculum to teach the children how to use it this summer.

Our environmental education intern, Talia, takes a look at the computer in Loibor Siret. She’s developing a curriculum to teach the children how to use it this summer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We asked all the children at the various schools if they were excited for the camps and they were eager to raise their hands. Those who attended in previous years shared their experiences and why they loved the Wildlife Clubs.

APW is getting ready for our first set of campers, arriving on July 1. We’ll be updating you on the fun we’ll be having, teaching the children about the environment and the many ways that they can become wildlife warriors.