Tag Archives: people

APW Winter Newsletter 2015

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Have you seen our winter newsletter? As we say farewell to 2015, we reflect on our past 10 years of work in Tanzania. From our innovative operation headquartered in the rural community of Loibor Siret on the southeastern boundary of Tarangire National Park, we are expanding our impact to communities across Northern Tanzania.

This year, we celebrate over 600 Living Walls in place, protecting the lives of over 100 of Tanzania’s lions, and over 100 000 cattle for 10 000 rural community members. We celebrate our women’s entrepreneurial groups, who started harvesting honey from their eco-friendly hives this past year. We celebrate Magayane Revocatus, our Conservation Education officer who is our second staff member to be named a Disney Conservation Hero. We celebrate our growing team of Warriors for Wildlife, local community members who have chosen to commit to work towards a brighter future for the wildlife in their communities. And of course we celebrate you — who continue to stand beside us and help us grow as we embark on our next decade in East Africa.

Thank you.

Read the full newsletter here, including a heartfelt thank you from our executive director Dr. Laly Lichtenfeld, and a debate in the science community on fencing Africa’s National Parks.

Noloholo Environmental Summer Camps Off to a Great Start

Children from the villages of Loibor Siret and Narakauo arrived yesterday morning for the first week of the Noloholo Environmental Summer Camps. After the first day we are pleased to see these shy, polite kids warming up to the staff here at Noloholo. For the next week they’ll be participating in a wide range of activities and lessons.

Our wildlife monitoring intern, Kelly Stoner with some of the kids bird watching on the patio at the Noloholo Environmental Center.

Our wildlife monitoring intern, Kelly Stoner with some of the kids bird watching on the patio at the Noloholo Environmental Center.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yesterday afternoon, Talia, our environmental education intern gave a lesson on how to create compost.  On several visits to the communities, APW was concerned about the trash disposal, and we hope that by giving the children the tools and information they need they can help create compost heaps in their communities and homes.

Talia Calnek-Sugin, our environmental education intern, giving her lesson on composting.

Talia Calnek-Sugin, our environmental education intern, giving her lesson on composting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Throughout the week, there will be daily bird watching and everyday the children will have a different lesson on the environment and conservation in Tanzania. Before today’s lunch they had a lesson on the history of Tanzanian conservation, which was taught by Neo, our environmental education officer. Neo also taught a lesson on beekeeping. Many of the kids were dressed in costumes and helped depict the life of a bee for the other children. The classroom here at Noloholo has begun to erupt with laughter and applause since the arrival of the kids.

The kids had a binocular lesson yesterday and went outside to apply what they had learnt in the classroom.

The kids had a binocular lesson yesterday and went outside to apply what they had learnt in the classroom.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tomorrow afternoon our wildlife monitoring intern, Kelly, will be taking the children out to see the camera traps at a nearby korongo. She is preparing a short lesson on how they gather information from the cameras and the many species of animals that APW has caught on the traps.

Rachel, a Noloholo Environmental Scholar, misses a volley during a friendly volleyball game after the day's activities.

Rachel, a Noloholo Environmental Scholar, misses a volley during a friendly volleyball game after the day’s activities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some of our environmental scholars will be joining us for the camps, helping the officers with the children and participating in the fun lessons and activities we have planned. Many of them are veterans to the camp, and are attending for the fourth year in a row. They are proving to be great role models for our younger campers who could be our newest potential scholars.

When the dinner bell rings, the footballs stop rolling and the boys stop playing.

When the dinner bell rings, the footballs stop rolling and the boys stop playing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To be considered for the camps, the children were given an exam testing them on the various lessons they have learnt in the Wildlife Clubs. APW chose the top 5 students from the villages Loibor Siret, Narakauo, Kimotorok and Kangala.